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Awesome pic from the last months release into the Arthur Valley (Fiordland).A very successful release!

It makes us immensely proud to play a role in helping restore our native bird populations.
Release days, like this one a few weeks back, are very special to us and a great reminder of why we do the work we do.
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Awesome pic from the last months release into the Arthur Valley (Fiordland).

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Totally beautiful place to visit, but also highlights why you can't trap all predators and why 1080 is such an important tool in the conservation toolbox. They have an extensive trapping program but still need to do pulse 1080 every few years to knock down the stoats over the larger area. The difference is 70 - 90% pateke survival 12 months post release, vs 12% pateke survival 12 months post release when their was a gap of 4 years of no 1080 (purely trapping).

It's not often we look up the records of previously released birds, but every now and then we get a nice surprise.This week we heard some great news! A pāteke female hatched at the Kiwi House was found to have lived to the ripe old age of 12 years old! This female was released to live in the wild on Urupukapuka Island in August 2012. The average survival rate for wild Pāteke is around 6 years. This female has lived twice as long and hopefully produced quite a few ducklings!
'Project Island Song' is a collaboration between a community group, 'Guardians of the Bay of Islands', Te Rāwhiti hapū, and the Department of Conservation. Together they have maintained 7 islands in the Bay of Islands, including Urupukapuka as pest-free. This has created a sanctuary for species like pāteke to rebuild populations. Thanks to these people's hard work our pāteke has lived a great and long life!

Find out more about the pāteke recovery programme and how to help: projectislandsong.co.nz
brownteal.com

Photo credit Fiona Collins
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Its not often we look up the records of previously released birds, but every now and then we get a nice surprise.

More great content from Cam. Conservation in NZ is about trapping predators, get rid of the predators and even the worst habitat explodes with wildlife. ... See MoreSee Less

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Am I spotting a Paradise Shelduck in the river?

25 brown teal / pāteke left here for release into the Arthur Valley, Fiordland. The release went well, all the birds came out of the boxes in a hurry and were happy to be liberated after their trip south. They are being monitored by DOC staff and have settled well into their new home. This photo shows them feeding, several days after release. Thank you to Louise McLaughlin from DOC for sharing this photo with us. ... See MoreSee Less

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